WTF : Your Employer Can Now Legally BAN Dreadlocks

Discrimination Against Locs Is Legal

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As if finding a job in corporate America isn’t difficult enough for Black men and women, a federal court has ruled that natural hair is grounds to be discriminated against. A suit was filed on behalf of Chastity Jones, a Black applicant who applied for a customer service representative position at Catastrophe Management Solutions in 2010. Court documents show that Jones was hired but the company rescinded their offer when she refused to cut her dreadlocks.

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The applicant was informed by human resources manager Jeannie Wilson that her hairstyle was in violation of the organization’s grooming policy which states, “All personnel are expected to be dressed and groomed in a manner that projects a professional and businesslike image while adhering to company and industry standards and/or guidelines. . . . [H]airstyle should reflect a business/professional image. No excessive hairstyles or unusual colors are acceptable[.]” EEOC argued that banning dreadlocks in the workplace constitutes racial discrimination because “dreadlocks are a manner of wearing the hair that is physiologically and culturally associated with people of African descent.” The judge in this case obviously disagreed. The fact that natural hair is still under fire, and furthermore is being made grounds for legal discrimination is unacceptable. Hopefully once this case goes to appeal, this ruling is overturned, and that all natural hair is deemed acceptable for office.

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Now this is some first class bs. Its things like that make it hard to believe its 2016. I have locs and i LOVE THEM. I would never support a business with these ridiculous policies. Let us BE FREE!

11-year-old Marley Dias Partners With Elle to Become the Editor of Her Own Magazine

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Marley Dias became our hero last year when she launched a campaign to secure 1000 books with Black girl protagonists. She exceeded her goal and drew national acclaim for her enterprising venture.

11-year-old Marley understands the importance of representation of was simply tired of reading about “white boys and their dogs.” She collected more than 7,000 books and scored meetings with Oprah, Michelle Obama and Ellen.

And now Marley gets to share her voice with her very own zine on Elle.com. Marley was named editor-in-residence of Marley Mag http://www.elle.com/marleymag/

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Marley expressed her excitement about the opportunity in her first editor’s letter. “I’ve always said that books have taken me on many adventures, but none of those adventures have been quite like this one. This isn’t a dystopian novel or a fantasy. It’s my real life. I, Marley Emerson Dias, have gotten the chance of a lifetime. I’m creating a brand-new zine for one of the most-read magazines in the world,” she wrote.

Marley donated the books she collected to Retreat Primary and Junior School and library in Jamaica and St. Cloud Elementary in West Orange, New Jersey. Marley is an inspiration for girls around the world, and her mom, Janice, put together a guide for adults who want to help their kids find diverse books.

Via The Culture

Fashion & Style 411 : Samjah Iman

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Born and raised in Monroe, LA. Attended Grambling State University for undergrad and Howard University for graduate school. In DC I worked for two prominent modeling agencies where I got the opportunity to work behind the scenes on major fashion shows and magazine shoots. I’ve written for online publications and magazines such as Everything Girls Love, Trenched In Style, and the Rouge Collection to name a few. I’ve been featured on fashion websites like Fashion Bomb Daily and Naija Fashion Daily. I am co owner of an online t-shirt boutique – http://www.chokolatcreme.com. This t-shirt company encourages women to wear what they are feeling literally and figuratively. Chokolat Creme is ambition and culture personified through fashion.

I currently reside in Baton Rouge, Louisiana with plans on locating to New Orleans in the near future

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Question 1: So when’s the first time you fell in love with FASHION? I fell in love with fashion when I was very young – about 4 or 5 years old. I would watch my mother get dressed for different occasions, and I would be in awe. When she would leave for her events, I would go in her closet and emulate what I just saw her wear. I would put on her dresses, tie her belt around my waist to hold the dresses on me, put her hats on, and her heels. My mother was my first connection to fashion….then I was exposed to the The Cosby Show. I witnessed Lisa Bonet’s (Denise Huxtable) style evolution and how she was free in her choices and different. Watching Lisa each week and seeing my mother take pride in her look turned me on to fashion. It became my drug of choice.

Question 2 : Do you have a signature STYLE? My signature style would be a great pair of distressed jeans, a soft t-shirt or bodysuit, some leather booties, and a worn leather bomber jacket or cardigan – add a big bag/purse, some big gold hoop earrings, a gold watch, some cool aviator shades, and I’m good to go.

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Question 3: Who is your favorite DESIGNER? I love minimalism when it comes to style so I would have to say American Apparel, H&M, Steve Madden, and Jimmy Choo.

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Question 4 : Who is your current STYLE crush? Elisa Johnson – Magic Johnson’s daughter. She is the epitome of style. It’s all about attitude/confidence, and she has that down to a tee.

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Question 5: How do you pick the ensembles you display? I get style inspiration from anywhere. I could be driving and hear a certain song and an outfit comes to my head. I could be going through my closet and see something that inspires me differently from how it inspired me before, and I rock it. Watching other people’s styles helps me choose my style. Window shopping helps me choose my looks. I sit down and outfit brainstorm sometimes, and I come up with looks. My style inspiration can come from
anywhere.

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Question 6 : What are some of your favorite boutiques to get your fashionable pieces? ASOS, Intuition.la for costume jewelry, Urban Outfitters, H&M, Steve Madden, American Apparel, and @shopvintagebowtique on Instagram.

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To Be Featured On Eccentric GLOW email me at eccentricglow@hotmail.com

Spike Lee’s Film ‘SHE’S GOTTA HAVE IT’ will be turned into a Netflix Series

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There is no doubt that Spike Lee has had a major impact on the culture with his films for more than 30 years.Now one of Spike Lee’s classic joints will be revived and turned into a Netflix series.

According to Entertainment Weekly, Spike Lee’s 1986 film, “She’s Gotta Have It” will be making its way to Netflix as a 10-episode miniseries.

This year marked the films 30th anniversary, and Lee’s wife, Tonya Lewis Lee came up with the idea to adapt the film for a new generation. The synopsis will stay true to the films original, which follows Nola Darling, a Brooklyn artist who dates three men at the same time as she finds it difficult on which one to choose.

Spike Lee said in a statement, “She’s Gotta Have It has a very special place in my heart. We shot this film in 12 days (2 six day weeks) way back in the back back of the hot summer of 1985 for a mere total of $175,000. Funds that we begged, borrowed and whatnot to get that money. This is the 1st official Spike Lee Feature Film Joint and everything that we have been blessed with in this tough business of film all have been due to SGHI.”

Spike Lee will direct all episodes of the miniseries and also serve as executive producer alongside with his wife.

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The Red Carpet , The Show, & Backstage: The 2016 BET Hip Hop Awards

The 2016 BET Hip Hop Awards went down at Atlanta’s Cobb Energy Performing Arts Centre on Saturday, September 17.

Some of the biggest names in Hip Hop today were in the building to celebrate the music and talent of our favorite artists.

The Arrivals

Snoop Dogg
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Young Jeezy
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DJ Khaled
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Remy Ma
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T.I
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Bre-Z
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Shameik Moore
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Cardi B
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Gucci Mane & Keyshia Dior
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Jidenna
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Erica Mena
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The Show and Backstage

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The Show will air on BET October 4 @ 8pm

Goals : How One 26-year-old Turned $500 Into $2 Million Online

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(CNN) What started with a compliment turned one young woman’s idea into a million dollar business.

When Kelechi Anyadiegwu started her online African clothing store Zuvaa with $500 two years ago, her idea was to share African-inspired designs with consumers around the world. Zuvaa is estimated to make $2 million in sales in 2016.

After receiving a compliment on her outfit, the tech savvy 24-year-old bought a domain name and started social media accounts.
“I didn’t really know what I was getting into, I just had a vision and I was excited about where that would take me,” New York-based Anyadiegwu told CNN in an interview.

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“As a women of Nigerian descent, I grew up with African prints and fabrics. I loved wearing African inspired designs, and whenever I did wear these pieces, people wanted to know how they could also shop African inspired prints.”
Instead of just referring these curious customers on to the designers she knew, Anyadiegwu saw a business opportunity.

“I decided to use my skills in social media marketing and online community building, to create a platform that would provide more exposure for the talented African-inspired fashion designers I knew existed around the world,” she said.

Her success has already landed her on the Forbes 30 under 30 list.
Passion x expertise = a winning formula
While the path of a tech entrepreneur is not an easy one, Anyadiegwu’s education set her up for success.

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After studying User Experience Design in the U.S., she combined her passion for representing Africa on the world stage, her keen eye for design and tech expertise.

“I’ve always been a techie. I’m very interested in how technology and design could be used to change lives.
“Zuvaa brought together everything I was ever interested in. My love for Africa, my interest in fashion and my skills in technology.”The life of a young entrepreneur

Anyadiegwu has been very vocal about the fact that she did not want a traditional 9 to 5 job.
And she’s not alone, according to research by Bentley University, 77% of millennials say flexible work hours make them more productive.
“My days are a lot longer than 9-5!” says Anyadiegwu. “From when I wake up to when I go to sleep, I’m working on Zuvaa. If I’m not directly working on Zuvaa, I’m definitely thinking about it.”

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Anyadiegwu predicts Zuvaa is on track to make $2 million in gross sales this year, she said having a clear vision is key.
“My biggest piece of advice is to trust your vision. Your vision for your life and company are really going to be what makes you stand out.
“No one is going to be able to see this vision, that’s what makes it so special, that what will set you apart from others, that’s what will make get every morning exciting to work and build your company.”
The name ‘Zuvaa’ comes from ‘Zuva’ which means sun or sunshine in the language of the Shona people from Zimbabwe. Anyadiegwu’s vision for the company is clear;
“We are building a movement of artisans, consumers and people around the world who want to know the stories behind their garments. Where they come from and who made them.”
“People are excited that their traditional prints are going global and it’s driven by people from their communities. Many are fascinated with the market that exists outside of Africa and how the global interest is trickling down to their local communities,” added the young entrepreneur.

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