Michelle Obama’s Thigh-High Glitter Boots Are Glowing

This former FLOTUS has some serious footwear game.

Michelle Obama made an appearance at Barclays Center on Wednesday night for the final stop of her book tour, where she was interviewed by Sarah Jessica Parker in a high-end outfit worthy of Carrie Bradshaw herself.

The “Becoming” author, 54, went all out with her designer duds, wearing a vibrant yellow silk wrap dress from Balenciaga’s spring 2019 collection paired with equally eye-catching shoes — the brand’s $3,900 gold sequined thigh-high boots. She also accessorized with $550 Jennifer Fisher gold ‘Baby Jamma’ hoops.

During the event, the former First Lady explained that during her time in the White House, “I did know that my clothes were making a statement, I knew that was the case. So we decided why don’t we use this platform to uplift some young new designers who normally wouldn’t get this kind of attention, because you can change their lives, which is one of the reasons why we chose Jason Wu for my inaugural gown.”

And if Obama’s past wardrobe choices are any indication, these disco-ready boots will be totally sold out in no time flat.

Via Page Six

Michelle Obama Reveals She Suffered A Miscarriage And Conceived Sasha & Malia Using IVF 

Michelle Obama opened up with Good Morning America about her past fertility issues.

The First Lady revealed that she suffered a miscarriage nearly 20 years ago and that she conceived both daughters using IVF.

via People:

“I felt lost and alone and I felt like I failed,” she says in a clip from Becoming Michelle: A First Lady’s Journey with Robin Roberts, which finds Obama expanding on topics explored in her upcoming new memoir, Becoming, out Tuesday.

At the time, Obama, 54, and former President Barack Obama, 57, were trying to start a family and she was feeling the pressure of her ticking “biological clock,” she tells Roberts. Eventually, the Chicago native turned to in vitro fertilization (IVF) in order to conceive the couple’s daughters Malia, 20, and Sasha, 17.

Reflecting on it now, Mrs. Obama says she wished she knew other women had experienced miscarriages as well — a lesson that would have helped lift the shame she associated with it.

“I felt like I failed because I didn’t know how common miscarriages were because we don’t talk about them,” Mrs. Obama explains in the ABC interview. “We sit in our own pain, thinking that somehow we’re broken.”

She’s hoping that by sharing her story, other women don’t feel that same isolation.

“That’s one of the reasons why I think it’s important to talk to young mothers about the fact that miscarriages happen and the biological clock is real because egg production is limited — I realized that as I was 34 and 35, and we had to do IVF,” she tells Roberts. “I think it’s the worst thing we do to each other as women: not share the truth about our bodies and how they work and how they don’t work.”

Her miscarriage and IVF journey are just some of the many revelations in Becoming. The memoir has Mrs. Obama tracing her life from a child on Chicago’s South Side through the eight years she spent in the White House as first lady.

 Becoming Michelle: A First Lady’s Journey with Robin Roberts airs on Sunday (9 p.m. ET) on ABC.

Style and Grace ICON : Michelle Obama

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The stunning and gracious icon we have come to adore these last years. This feature isn’t about her beauty. The issue includes 4 love letters written by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Jon Meacham, Gloria Steinem and Rashida Jones. Each letter, praising our beloved First Lady for her many contributions to the world.

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Trying to sum up what each letter in details is IMPOSSIBLE , but I couldn’t begin to emulate the emotion and beauty encapsulated in each word.

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Here are some of the excerpts of the letters from each writer:

Adichie’s writes:

Because she said what she thought, and because she smiled only when she felt like smiling, and not constantly and vacuously, America’s cheapest caricature was cast on her: the Angry Black Woman. Women, in general, are not permitted anger — but from black American women, there is an added expectation of interminable gratitude, the closer to groveling the better, as though their citizenship is a phenomenon that they cannot take for granted.

Jones writes:

All women struggle to reconcile the different people that we are at all times, to merge our conflicting desires, to represent ourselves honestly and feel good about the inherent contradictions. But Michelle manages to do this with poise, regardless of the scrutiny.

Steinem writes:

After a decade under a public microscope, she has managed what no other first lady — and few people in any public position — have succeeded in doing: She has lived a public life without sacrificing her privacy and authenticity. She made her husband both more human and effective as a president by being his interpreter and defender, but also someone we knew was capable of being his critic. Eventually, she spoke up about the pain of the racist assumptions directed at her, but she waited until her husband could no longer be politically punished for her honesty. And she has always been the best kind of mother, which means insisting that fathers be equal parents. All of this she has done with honesty, humor and, most important, kindness.

Jon Meacham writes:

The Obama skeptics and the Obama haters have from time to time questioned her patriotism, but this is the same country that managed, in some quarters, to hold Eleanor Roosevelt in contempt. The important thing is that Mrs. Obama, a clear-eyed lawyer, found a way to withstand the scrutiny of the spotlight. In point of fact, she did more than withstand it. To borrow a phrase from William Faulkner, she not only endured it; she prevailed

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