Girls’ Trip : New Orleans For Essence Festival

Essence Festival is the mother of all festivals its been going down since 94′ Its the official party with a purpose, and this year the legacy continued with four days of music, empowerment, community and entertainment.

Big names in the game like Queen Latifah , Jada Pinkett Smith , Larenz Tate , Issa Rae and more where in the building to inspire us. While Mary J. Blige , Diana Ross , Chance the Rapper , Xscape and more where there to keep us on our feet. It was truly an amazing experience.

It was alot of free experiences too that i didnt know about that im now kicking myself for but ill be back!

June 30 – July 5th we visited New Orleans for Essence Festival. We rented a guest house called Blue60 Guesthouse for our stay. This video is of our day to night adventures with my sister Kay and our friend Nikki. We really enjoyed our stay and we let our hair down – Nawlins was LIT! I filmed what i could but i definitely was indulging in the moment. Hope you like it

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Fashion & Style 411 : Samjah Iman

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Born and raised in Monroe, LA. Attended Grambling State University for undergrad and Howard University for graduate school. In DC I worked for two prominent modeling agencies where I got the opportunity to work behind the scenes on major fashion shows and magazine shoots. I’ve written for online publications and magazines such as Everything Girls Love, Trenched In Style, and the Rouge Collection to name a few. I’ve been featured on fashion websites like Fashion Bomb Daily and Naija Fashion Daily. I am co owner of an online t-shirt boutique – http://www.chokolatcreme.com. This t-shirt company encourages women to wear what they are feeling literally and figuratively. Chokolat Creme is ambition and culture personified through fashion.

I currently reside in Baton Rouge, Louisiana with plans on locating to New Orleans in the near future

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Question 1: So when’s the first time you fell in love with FASHION? I fell in love with fashion when I was very young – about 4 or 5 years old. I would watch my mother get dressed for different occasions, and I would be in awe. When she would leave for her events, I would go in her closet and emulate what I just saw her wear. I would put on her dresses, tie her belt around my waist to hold the dresses on me, put her hats on, and her heels. My mother was my first connection to fashion….then I was exposed to the The Cosby Show. I witnessed Lisa Bonet’s (Denise Huxtable) style evolution and how she was free in her choices and different. Watching Lisa each week and seeing my mother take pride in her look turned me on to fashion. It became my drug of choice.

Question 2 : Do you have a signature STYLE? My signature style would be a great pair of distressed jeans, a soft t-shirt or bodysuit, some leather booties, and a worn leather bomber jacket or cardigan – add a big bag/purse, some big gold hoop earrings, a gold watch, some cool aviator shades, and I’m good to go.

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Question 3: Who is your favorite DESIGNER? I love minimalism when it comes to style so I would have to say American Apparel, H&M, Steve Madden, and Jimmy Choo.

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Question 4 : Who is your current STYLE crush? Elisa Johnson – Magic Johnson’s daughter. She is the epitome of style. It’s all about attitude/confidence, and she has that down to a tee.

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Question 5: How do you pick the ensembles you display? I get style inspiration from anywhere. I could be driving and hear a certain song and an outfit comes to my head. I could be going through my closet and see something that inspires me differently from how it inspired me before, and I rock it. Watching other people’s styles helps me choose my style. Window shopping helps me choose my looks. I sit down and outfit brainstorm sometimes, and I come up with looks. My style inspiration can come from
anywhere.

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Question 6 : What are some of your favorite boutiques to get your fashionable pieces? ASOS, Intuition.la for costume jewelry, Urban Outfitters, H&M, Steve Madden, American Apparel, and @shopvintagebowtique on Instagram.

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To Be Featured On Eccentric GLOW email me at eccentricglow@hotmail.com

And Do You Belong? I Do By SOLANGE KNOWLES

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Solange Knowles penned this amazing blog about her encounter with a racist women.

The tone.

It’s the same one that says to your friend, “BOY…. go on over there and hand me my bag” at the airport, assuming he’s a porter.

It’s the same one that tells you, “m’am, go into that other line over there” when you are checking in at the airport at the first class counter before you even open up your mouth.

It’s the same one that yells and screams at you and your mother in your sleep when you’re on the train from Milan to Basel “give me your passport NOW.” You look around to see if anyone else is being requested this same thing only to see a kind Italian woman actually confront the agents on your behalf and ask why you are being treated this way.

It’s the same tone that the officer has when she tells you your neighborhood is blocked for residents only as you and your friends drive home from a Mardi Gras parade, when you have a residents tag on your car. You’ve been in the car line for 10 minutes and watched them let every one else pass without stopping them at all.

It usually does not include “please.” It does not include “will you.” It does not include “would you mind,” for you must not even be worth wasting their mouths forming these respectable words. Although, you usually see them used seconds before or after you.

You don’t feel that most of the people in these incidents do not like black people, but simply are a product of their white supremacy and are exercising it on you without caution, care, or thought.

Many times the tone just simply says, “I do not feel you belong here.”

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Imagine.

Telling your son and his friend Rasheed about a band you love and one that played a pivotal role in the history of hip-hop. Something that as a family you all feel very connected to.

Imagine, although the kids are interested, they are still 11, unfamiliar, and would rather be spending their Friday night differently. You and your husband are always talking to your son about expansion and being open to other things and experiences, so you guys make the Kraftwerk concert a family Friday night.

You get there about 10 minutes late, but lucky for you, as soon as you walk to your box seats, the song that you just played for your son in the car is on! It’s a song his uncle sampled, ” The Hall of Mirrors.” You haven’t even sat down yet because you just walked to your seat and you’re so excited to dance to this DANCE MUSIC SONG.

Simultaneously, a much older black venue attendant comes over to your son and his friend and yells “No electronic cigarettes allowed, you need to stop doing that now!”

You are too into the groove and let your husband handle it and tell the attendant that the children are 11 years old, and it’s actually the two grown white men in front of you guys who were smoking them.

You are annoyed and feel it’s extremely problematic that someone would challenge their innocence, but determined to stay positive and your husband has handled this accordingly.

About 20 seconds later, you hear women yell aggressively, “Sit down now, you need to sit down right now” from the box behind you. You want to be considerate, however, they were not at all considerate with their tone, their choice of words, or the fact that you just walked in and seem to be enjoying yourself.

You are also confused as to what show you went to. This is a band that were pioneers of electronic and dance music. Surely the audience is going to expect you to dance at some point.

You were planning on sitting down after this song, as long as it wasn’t one of the four songs that you really connect with and plan on getting down to.

You feel something heavy hit you on the back of your shoulder, but consider that you are imagining things because well….certainly a stranger would not have the audacity.

Moments later, you feel something again, this time smaller, less heavy, and your son and his friend tell you those ladies just hit you with a lime.

You look down only to see the half eaten lime on the ground below you.

You inhale deeply. Your husband calmly asks the group of women did they just throw trash at you. One woman says, “I just want to make it clear, I was not the one who yelled those horrible, nasty, things at you.”

Loud enough for you to hear.

This leads you to believe they were saying things way worse than what you heard, but you are not surprised at that part one bit.

You’re full of passion and shock, so you share this story on Twitter, hands shaking, because you actually want these women to face accountability in some kind of way. You know that you cannot speak to them with out it escalating because they have no respect for you or your son, and this will only end badly for you and feel it’s not worth getting the police involved. So, you are hoping they will hear you this way.

You know when you share this that a part of the population is going to side with the women who threw trash at you. You know that they will come up with every excuse to remove that huge part of the incident and make this about you standing up at a concert “blocking someone’s view.”

You know that a lot of the media will not even mention the trash being thrown at you with your 11 year old son being present.

You feel that the headline would be “XYZ Goes To A Concert And Gets Trash Thrown At Them,” if it were some of your other non-black peers in the industry.

You constantly see the media having a hard time contextualizing black women and men as victims every day, even when it means losing their own lives.

You do not care in that moment because you understand that many of your followers will understand and have been through this same type of thing many a times, and if it means them hearing you say it’s ok, you will rise again through out these moments, then it means something bigger to you.

You realize that you never called these women racists, but people will continuously put those words in your mouth.

What you did indeed say is, “This is why many black people are uncomfortable being in predominately white spaces,” and you still stand true to that.

You and your friends have been called the N word, been approached as prostitutes, and have had your hair touched in a predominately white bar just around the corner from the same venue.

The statement you make headlines funny enough just days after it comes to light that Air China warns their flyers not to go into Indian, Pakastani, or Black neighborhoods in its magazines in order to stay safe, while Texas schools are fighting to have textbooks calling Mexicans “lazy” removed from classrooms, and while Native Americans are doing everything they can possibly to to protect their sacred land from an oil pipeline being built on graves of their descendants. You know that people of colors’ “spaces” are attacked every single day, but many will not be able to see it that way.

This also comes during a time when the Housing Authority of New Orleans has declared a federal mandate plan to assist with helping to protect black neighborhoods, stating that “previously black neighborhoods on higher ground are now majority white or moving in that direction.” And not too long after an announcement is made that a former Klu Klux Klan leader is running for Louisiana senator. You also know where you live.

You are also fully aware, now that you use your platform consistently to speak out on social, racial, and feminist issues, that people who have no awareness of your work outside of gossip sites and magazines, some of which who are most likely voting for Donald Trump, have been starting to engage and/or target you in public and social media in regards to race.

(And yes, having white people constantly call you the n word, or say you and your people are degenerates that need to leave America, or zoo like animals, surely does not help you feel more comfortable in predominately white spaces)

You’d like to use the classic “I have many white friends” or “Half of my wedding guest were white” line to prove that you do not dislike white people but dislike the way that many white people are constantly making you feel. To combat headlines like “Solange feels uncomfortable with white people” but know that there is no amount of explaining that you will do to get through to this type of person in the first place.

You have lived a part of your life in predominately white spaces since you were a kid, had your 3rd grade teacher tell you “what a nigger is” in front of your whole entire white class, and had your own parents come up to the school to try to explain why that was wrong, only to not ever get your point across again and again.

After you think it all over, you know that the biggest payback you could ever had (after, go figure, they then decided they wanted to stand up and dance to songs they liked) was dancing right in front of them with my hair swinging from left to right, my beautiful black son and husband, and our dear friend Rasheed jamming the hell out with the rhythm our ancestors blessed upon us saying….

We belong. We belong. We belong.

We built this.

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Just Married: Solange Knowles & Alan Ferguson Tie the Knot 

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You’re looking at the first official photo of Mr. & Mrs. Ferguson! Solange and her longtime boyfriend Alan got married today in New Orleans in front of about 200 people.

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via PEOPLE:

The happy couple said “I do” at the Marigny Opera House in New Orleans. Around 2 p.m., the pair arrived via white-painted vintage bicycles, and it was all about the details: The bride’s basket held flowers!

“Beaming. Calm. They looked pretty calm, relaxed on their wedding day,” one onlooker tells PEOPLE. “Definitely happy.” 

As for their arrival attire, the bride rocked a cream pantsuit with a cape and plunging V-neck (accenting her look with a red lip), while the groom matched in a white suit sans tie.

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Ahead of their nuptials, the newlyweds celebrated with anintimate pre-wedding bashFriday at NOLA’s Indywood Cinema, which Hayley Sampson, the theater’s co-owner, told PEOPLE, “was pretty adorable.”

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Solange looks absolutely radiant! We love the fact that she got married in a pantsuit — so chic!

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Beyonce , Jay and Blue were also in attendance
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Momma Knowles boyfriend Richard and cool kid Juelz

SN: Tina came to SERVE honey #snatched

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