Where’s The Lie Though!? : Rihanna On Her Thicker Body ‘You Want to Have a Butt, Then You Have a Gut’

In addition to Rihanna’s incredible cover & editorial for British Vogue, the natural curves friendly interview proves that Rih’s on a mission to being a body image icon!

When asked why women love her, she responded:

“I don’t know, maybe it’s because I’m ‘thicc’ now. I don’t know.”

Despite being comfortable with her fuller frame, Rihanna says she’s ready to get back in the gym — but keeps it real.

“I’m about to get back into the gym and stuff, and I hope I don’t lose my butt or my hips or all of my thighs,” she said. “I’ll lose some but not all. And I think of my boobs, like, ‘Imma lose everything, everything goes!’ ”

“But, you know, it comes with a price. You want to have a butt, then you have a gut,” she said.

The REALIST Shit Ive Heard In Awhile. You can read more from Rihanna when the September issue of British Vogue hits newsstands on Friday, Aug. 3.

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Beyoncé Given Full Control Over Her September ‘Vogue’ Shoot, Hired the First Black Cover Photographer in the Mag’s 126 Year History

Beyoncé is changing the live of a young Black photographer.

According to the Huffington Post, Vogue editor-in-chief Anna Wintour gave Beyoncé unprecedented control over the cover + editorial for her upcoming September issue.

via HuffPo:

As part of her power, Bey reportedly hired the first black photographer to shoot a Vogue cover in the publication’s 126-year history.

His name is Tyler Mitchell and he’s just 23 years old.

The publication is contractually obligated to give Beyoncé full control over the cover, the photos of her inside the magazine and the captions, which she has written herself and are in long-form, according to two sources who are familiar with the agreement between Vogue and Beyoncé but aren’t authorized to speak to the press.

Beyoncé chose Tyler Mitchell, 23, to be her photographer.

“I depict black people and people of color in a really real and pure way,” Mitchell, who has already made a splash by shooting campaigns for Marc Jacobs and Givenchy, told The New York Times in December. “There is an honest gaze to my photos.”

Wintour has always exerted complete control over the fashion bible, including selecting the outfits worn by cover models. Cover subjects are usually given little to no say in their photos and are sent the cover in the week ahead of publication, a source familiar with the editorial process at the publication told HuffPost.

The cover is also likely to be Wintour’s last September issue, according to four sources familiar with her plans. Vogue parent company Condé Nast repeatedly has said the editor is not leaving the magazine.

Black Women Are The True Pioneers Of Acrylic Nails 

Think back to the moment when you got your first manicure or the time your mother gave you the okay to get acrylic nails. How did it make you feel? Powerful? Feminine? Grown up?

For most young Black women, getting our nails done is the ultimate act of self-love and care. And with the success of TV shows like Claws and Boss Nails, acrylic nails are having a beauty resurgence.

The modern acrylics we see today on influential stars, like Rihanna, Zendaya and Keke Palmer, are less than 70 years old. But it’s well-documented that Black women have been wearing artificial nails for decades — long before acrylics became mainstream.

Actually, you can thank a dentist named Frederick Slack Jr. for the invention of acrylics. In the 1950s, he broke his nail and used different chemicals and dental acrylics to create an artificial-looking nail to go over his old one. Of course, the trend trickled down to the African-American community and was very prominent in Hip-Hop culture in the ‘80s and ‘90s.

1966

Donyale Luna was the first Black model to appear on the cover of Vogue, and she sported acrylic nails in Twen Magazine in 1966.

1970s

Legendary singer and actress Diana Ross paired her signature red lip with red artificial nails. She soon swaped the long, round shapes she wore in the ‘70s for more of a square shape in the ‘80s. 

1979

Singer-songwriter Millie Jackson wore red talon-esque nails on the cover of her album A Moment’s Pleasure.

1980s

Olympic track star Florence Griffith-Joyner’s claws were often the topic of discussion, even more so than her athleticism. Having worked as a nail tech, Flo-Jo brought her skills to the track, wearing four-to-six inch acrylic nails.

1990s

Although many R&B stars wore long acrylic nails in the ‘90s, it was girl group SWV who was most known for it, especially lead singer Coko. As a young child, growing up in a religious home, Coko rebelliously began growing her nails long. By the time SWV hit the music scene, her curved nails often commanded more attention than her incredible voice.

1998

Janet Jackson embraced pierced acrylic nails in the ‘98 video for Busta Rhymes’ sensuous song, What’s It Gonna Be

Today, there are more than six different nail shapes, including almond, square, coffin, oval and, the increasingly popular, stiletto. Not to mention, today, nail art enthusiasts can glam their digits up with jewelry, rhinestones and different painting techniques.

This Article Was Originally Featured on Essence.com

Let Freedom Reign

“We were carried here in shackles from the homeland
Broom-chopped, chain-locked, brainwashed, programmed
Time’s changed, freedom reigns, I’m a grown man
Holding the future in the palms of my own hands
In this world the coonery and tomfoolery
All I’m trying to do is stay true to my community
The daily news ain’t the only thing that’s schooling me
Watching these haters operating with impunity
It’s dirty dollar signs
Black and white collar crimes
Running out of time
Out of sight, out of mind
It gets realer in Israel, in Palestine
Troubles of the world start to seem intertwined
War criminals, conflict minerals
Pillagers are coming home
Five-star generals
Telling lies in press conferences and interviews
I’m trying to take back the power
Cause it’s been abused.” Black Thought

Black girls are punished and mocked for their originality while others co-opt it. ‪#‎VogueArticles‬ 

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The very people who exclude black girls from beauty standards profit from and co-opt black women’s creations. #VogueArticle

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For the same reasons Vogue says Jennifer Lopez ushered in the “booty” era. When something is inherent to our culture, it is marginalized and seen as undesirable. When the dominant culture does it, they are given benefit of doubt. We saw this with Miley Cyrus and twerking, JLO and booty, Angelina Jolie and thick lips.

What’s going on Family.. lets talk. These double standards HAVE TO STOP?

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